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How To: Replace spark plugs

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How To: Replace spark plugs

Postby ^^v » Thu Aug 04, 2005 7:49 am

hey guys,

i think its time to change my sparkplugs (its been 4 1/2 years and gone 24,000km's since we brought the car and the plugs havent been changed)

so i was wondering if someone could put up a DIY for spark plug change (with pics)... on a 1.5 01 Lanos
it would be greatly appreciated! :D
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Postby TheGreatAndPowerfulOz » Thu Aug 04, 2005 8:49 am

Remember, when changing spark plugs, dont' forget to put anti-sieze paste on the threads so the threads do not bind into the threads of the cyllinder head. That makes the plugs easy to remove next time they need to be changed. :)



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Postby daewooluvr » Thu Aug 04, 2005 2:56 pm

TheGreatAndPowerfulOz wrote:Remember, when changing spark plugs, dont' forget to put anti-sieze paste on the threads so the threads do not bind into the threads of the cyllinder head. That makes the plugs easy to remove next time they need to be changed. :)



Cliff


honestly I've never had to do that and had no problems. Just remember that you're not going to be torquing the spark plugs as hard as you can.
Anyone have the actual torque specs handy?
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Postby MMamdouh » Thu Aug 04, 2005 3:14 pm

daewooluvr wrote:
TheGreatAndPowerfulOz wrote:Remember, when changing spark plugs, dont' forget to put anti-sieze paste on the threads so the threads do not bind into the threads of the cyllinder head. That makes the plugs easy to remove next time they need to be changed. :)



Cliff


honestly I've never had to do that and had no problems. Just remember that you're not going to be torquing the spark plugs as hard as you can.
Anyone have the actual torque specs handy?


i never had to do that either... as for torquing the sparks, i use the spark plug manufacturer specs which in most cases recommend a 1/4 turn after you completly fasten the plug with your hands. if the plug was already installed before and you took it out for inspection or so then turn it 1/16 of a turn instead of 1/4 turn.

as for replacment procedure: just follow the spark plug wires to the place where the pugs installed (if you don't know where they are) then:
1- remove the spark plug cable.
2- take off the old spark plug.
3- gap the new plug according to the manufacturer specs.
4- install the new plug.
5- place the spark plug wire again.

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Postby BosnianLanos » Thu Aug 04, 2005 6:29 pm

mmamdouh: 100% right, everyone says 1/4 past when the plugs are finger tight also right about not having to use anti-seize, I have never done that and have never had a problem, anti-seize is basically a problem of large cars with a bigger tendancy to overheat and the different metals bind together in the cylinder head creating huge problems. I don't think it is necessary for our 4-bangers.
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Postby TheGreatAndPowerfulOz » Fri Aug 05, 2005 2:20 am

I have always used anti-seize ever since I broke a spark plug off in the head of my Renault and had to replace one of the cyllinder heads in my VW Beetle because one of the plugs would not come out, no matter how hard I tried.

I say it is better to have it and not need it, than to need it and not have it.
or
Better safe than sorry. :)
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Postby MMamdouh » Fri Aug 05, 2005 2:16 pm

TheGreatAndPowerfulOz wrote:Better safe than sorry. :)


i agree with that OZ but in here we don't have such products, we don't have caliper greas, anti seize or even torque meters to know how much to tigten bolts... doing car service in here is like going into a mine field where a simple procedure as walking can cause catastrophic results.

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Postby ^^v » Sun Aug 07, 2005 6:38 am

thanks for the tips guys...

but the thing im worried about is taking the leads out....

Image

in the circled part..... how do i take the hexagon shaped thing out? do i just pull it out? or do i pull the whole cylinder thing out as well?

after that... does it leave the sparkplug exposed? and is it just a simple process of unscrewing it out...? (with a torque wrench attached to a SP removal head)

help :oops:
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Postby MMamdouh » Sun Aug 07, 2005 9:58 am

no need to take off the hex. thingy out of the metal cylender at all... they all come out as one part.

the hex part is just a heat scheild for the rubber socket and you don't need to remove it... the new set of leads got new scheilds so the removal process is not required.

taking off the lead without breaking it is kinda tricky... i have broke two sets already till i learned the right way.

first you grab the lead from the top of the metal heat shceild (make sure it is cold) then move it in a circular motion to loosen the grip of the clip at the end of the lead then while you are doing the circular motion; gentley pull out the lead.

DO NOT and i repeat DO NOT hold the wire itself... this is how i broke my two sets of leads, oly hold from the metal scheild so that the rubber end spreads the pulling force on a larger area of the lead and avoid breaking it.

after you successfuly pull out the lead you will see the spark plug and can easly remove it using a spark plug wrench or a regular wrench just like any other bolt.

when you put the new spark plugs in; make sure they are gapped correctly (0.7 to 0.8 mm in your case) then tighten the spark plug by hand first then tighten it by the spark plug wrench to the manufacturer specs.

i hope this helps.

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Postby ^^v » Mon Aug 08, 2005 11:38 am

hey thankz alot mmamdouh! that helped alot... :D
think i'll go with the BOSCH Super 4's

but one more thing before i do it... after i put in the new plugs... do the leads just snap into place? is there some kinda special way of putting the leads back on?

thanks in advance!
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Postby MMamdouh » Mon Aug 08, 2005 1:16 pm

No special way to put the leads back on... usualy it is much easyer to but them back than to take them off, just puch them over the spark plug but keep your hand on the hex. part at all times... the leads are too sensitive to harsh handling.

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Postby genie47 » Mon Aug 08, 2005 5:41 pm

An aircraft technician servicing Hueys told me not to go near anti-sieze. He recommends high temperature grease. The pink stuff. The problem with anti-sieze he says is that too much of it will cause siezes. With grease, you don't get that problem. Just that many people apply too much of the stuff.

So I have been happily using grease. No problems so far. Furthermore, I invested in a Britool torque wrench. Gave me lots of peace.
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Postby norbie » Sun Jul 30, 2006 3:38 pm

I know this is an old thread, but I'm about to change my spark plugs.

MMamdouh's guide is very good above, but what does this mean? :?

"make sure they are gapped correctly (0.7 to 0.8 mm in your case)"
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Postby MMamdouh » Sun Jul 30, 2006 5:08 pm

the "gap" is the distance between the positive electrod and the negative electrode as shown in this magnifyed pic.
Image

in our cars this gap should be between 0.7 to 0.8 mm and to adjust that gap you must have a feeler or a gapping tool to set the gap correctly.

feeler
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gapping tool
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Postby norbie » Sun Jul 30, 2006 5:54 pm

Thanks, I bought the V Grooves part number that are for my car though, will they not already be set?
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